Kirkby Malzeard, Laverton & Dallowgill   kirkbymalzeard.org.uk  - info@kirkbymalzeard.org.uk World War 2
Personal memories from the war years is the subject of a new oral history project underway in the village. If you can help by sharing photographs or your recollections, happy or sad, about changes in village life, servicemen in the village, land army girls, evacuees or anything else from this time please get in touch.
The Rev. H.Ellis Horton was vicar at St. Andrews Church during the whole of the war, and addressed a letter to his parishioners every month in the parish magazine. .Although of course most of his missives were concerned with the details of church life, he also mentioned the major events of the war. As he was a gifted and fluent writer I have used his words to highlight some key events of the war, and have added local detail taken from the minutes of contemporary Mechanics' Institute committee meetings, as well as from the parish magazines and the memories of some of our older residents. (Kirsty Hallett.)
In October 1939 Rev. Horton wrote "modern war directly affects the whole population, and, as time goes on, we shall find in various ways how it affects each one of us."
The tragic events of 1939 - 1945 had an inevitable impact on life here, although this was not as overwhelming as it was in many towns and cities. Fortunately the village was not bombed, and only one local man died on military duty. Kirkby Malzeard was a small farming village, with less than two hundred people on the electoral roll during the war, all of whom had to adapt to the many changes described in this history.
The tragic events of 1939 - 1945 had an inevitable impact on life here, although this was not as overwhelming as it was in many towns and cities. Fortunately the village was not bombed, and only one local man died on military duty. Kirkby Malzeard was a small farming village, with less than two hundred people on the electoral roll during the war, all of whom had to adapt to the many changes described in this history.
The outbreak of war was preceded in July 1939 by the arrival of the military camp, which was on the south east side of the village. The arrival of troops, and later evacuees, meant that the local population grew considerably. Although I know very little about the soldiers from the Derbyshire Yeomanry who were stationed here it appears that they were initially made to feel welcome. For example the Mechanics' Institute allowed them half price (sixpence) admission to the next dance , and immediately agreed that the hall should be open every night for badminton. In October 1939 the Royal Corps of Signals joined the camp, thus further enlarging the local community.